Seminole Crop E News

Agricultural News for Farmers and Agribusiness in SW Georgia

  • RSS Ag News

    • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.
  • Enter email for new posts.

    Join 128 other followers

Peanut Herbicide Drift

Posted by romeethredge on June 21, 2011

We’ve started using more Ignite on cotton varieties tolerant to it, and it works well if you follow the specific ways of using it. One more thing to watch for is drift onto peanuts. We can’t let it get on peanuts or we’ll see big yield losses. See photo below of where some Ignite drifted onto these peanuts 10 days ago. As you can see from Dr. Prostko’s chart below , you can loose a third of your peanut yield by getting a third rate (8 ozs) of Ignite on your peanuts.

Dr Eric Prostko, UGA Extension Scientist, gives us the info below on figuring losses.

Peanut Response to Ignite Ignite (glufosinate) has become an extremely popular
herbicide in Georgia due to our troubles with herbicide-resistant Palmer
amaranth. Peanuts are very sensitive to Ignite. Consequently, I expect
to see more problems in peanuts with off-target movement (drift) and sprayer
contamination. As little as 2 oz/A of Ignite can reduce peanut yields from 6
to 19% depending upon the time of application. Thus, Ignite drift and sprayer
contamination must be avoided. The following table provides an estimate of
peanut yield losses from various rates of Ignite applied at 30, 60, and 90
days after planting. Table 1. Estimated Peanut (GA-06G) Yield Losses (%) from
Ignite 2.34SL.1

Ignite Rate/A

Time of Application (DAP2)

(ozs)

30

60

90

0

0

0

0

2

6.4

6.8

19.3

4

13.2

10.0

23.7

6

19.9

13.2

28.0

8

26.7

16.5

32.3

10

33.5

19.7

36.6

12

40.3

22.9

40.9

16

53.8

29.3

49.5

32

100

55.0

84.0

1Based upon data
from 2 field trials conducted in 2010 (Ponder Farm, Plains). 2DAP = days
after planting.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: