Seminole Crop E News

Agricultural News for Farmers and Agribusiness in SW Georgia

Archive for March, 2013

Question of the Week – Coots

Posted by romeethredge on March 30, 2013

The last question was about birds we saw on Lake Seminole. They were Coots. We often see them in the winter and early spring on the lake in large numbers. They are not ducks, they don’t waddle when they walk.

 

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Now it’s time for this week’s question. What did I watch being sprayed this week in a field in southern Seminole county? Here’s the photo.

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Posted in Agriculture, vegetables, Wildlife | Tagged: | 2 Comments »

Forages Conference

Posted by romeethredge on March 30, 2013

A great forage conference will be held next week in Perry, Ga. Here’s the schedule of events. For registration information, go to this link. http://www.caes.uga.edu/commodities/fieldcrops/forages/events/FC13/FC13.html

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Cold Over?

Posted by romeethredge on March 30, 2013

Now, are we ready for warm weather? The old timer’s traditional ways of telling when we won’t get any more hard cold are saying winter is over. Muscadine vines are putting on growth. And a few pecan trees are starting to green up just a little. Both of these plants have a heat requirement after winter cold season so usually they aren’t fooled. Another reason to believe that cold weather is past us is that it’s Easter tomorrow. We had our usual Easter cold snap this last week, it was colder than it normally is for it, however.

Muscadine vines putting on spring growth.

Muscadine vines putting on spring growth.

Pecans leafing out.

Pecans leafing out.

 

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Hard crusty Soil

Posted by romeethredge on March 30, 2013

Corn that is just coming up or that will soon be emerging needs a light irrigation in almost every case I looked at yesterday. Recent rains and drying winds caused a hard crust in most fields. To ensure good even emergence the soil needs to be softened.

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Late Cold Spring Frost

Posted by romeethredge on March 30, 2013

We had a late frost this week. Our normal last frost date is March 14, but we had frost this week on March 27th. See the numbers below from our weather station here in Donalsonville. It got down to 32.1 that morning. Thankfully it didn’t stay cold very long and didn’t cause much damage. Corn that was up and was shining in the row last week is now an almost neon yellow and has some cold damage to emerged leaves. Some young vegetables that had been set out are set back but are alive for the most part. Snap beans just emerging look ok. It’s interesting to me to see that the daily average 2 inch soil temperatures still look ok for the past few days. This is good for corn still in the ground.

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Snap beans just coming up.

Snapbean field.

Snapbean field.

Squash cold and wind damage.

Squash cold and wind damage.

Just dodged the bullet, growing point still alive, it should survive.

Just dodged the bullet, growing point still alive, it should survive.

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Wheat Heading

Posted by romeethredge on March 30, 2013

Some wheat is now heading and by the end of next week we will see a lot of grain heads. As soon as the heads emerge is the best time for fungicide applications, so that we get the disease protection on the flag leaves and heads. I’m still seeing plenty of powdery mildew and a little leaf rust. I have not seen any stripe rust or stem rust. As far as insects, I’m seeing a few aphids but not much else. I saw one brown stink bug in a wheat field.

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Two different wheat varieties here. They were planted on the same day. One is jointing and approaching flag leaf emergence and the other one has not yet begun jointing, it has a higher cold requirement(vernalization).

Two different wheat varieties here. They were planted on the same day. One is jointing and approaching flag leaf emergence and the other one has not yet begun jointing, it has a higher cold requirement(vernalization).

Posted in Wheat | Tagged: | 2 Comments »

Cotton Prices

Posted by romeethredge on March 22, 2013

Here is a cotton economic report from Dr. Don Shurley, UGA Extension Ag Economist.

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Vegetable Transplants

Posted by romeethredge on March 22, 2013

It’s time to get vegetable transplants set out. Here’s Jeff Braswell with his melons, cantaloupes, squash and cucumber plants he has grown in the greenhouse and he’ll set these out soon and in about a month or so we should have good fresh squash to eat. See the useful vegetable planting chart below that can be used for home gardens. _DSC3719

Here's a watermelon plant with the seed coat still sticking to the cotyledon.

Here’s a watermelon plant with the seed coat still sticking to the cotyledon. Every germinating seed is a miracle into itself.

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Summer Annual Grazing

Posted by romeethredge on March 22, 2013

It’s getting closer to time for planting summer annauls for cattle grazing, so some folks have questioned me about it this week. Here’s a very good video by our UGA Extension Forage Scientist, Dr Dennis Hancock. Just click on the photo of the grasses. I also have here some more information concerning these grasses.

Plantings of warm season annual grasses can be made in the spring as soon as the soil temperature (at 2 in. depth) warms to 65º F and can be planted as late as July without a yield penalty (Table 1). Seed can be broadcast or drilled in narrow (< 15 in.) or wide (up to 36 in.) rows. Seed should be planted at a soil depth of ½ – 1 inch. Ideally, summer annual grasses should be established on well-drained, fertile soils with good water-holding capacity.

Higher seeding rates may help to decrease stem size, but it is unlikely that this will be valuable enough to compensate for the expense of the higher seeding rate. Further, sorghums that have been seeded at higher rates will often have more lodging problems, especially relative to dwarf pearl millet stands.

Even out the grazing supply over the summer by making multiple plantings. Two plantings made four to six weeks apart provide good quality forage throughout the summer. Plantings made in early June will be in peak production when April plantings are starting to decline in productivity. If plants become stemmy from selective grazing, mechanically clip them to a height of 10 – 12 inches and fertilize with N. With good grazing management, clipping may not be necessary.

Photoperiod-sensitive sorghum x sudan and foragesorghum cultivars are available. These varieties are capable of sustaining more consistent growth over a longer-growing season because they remain in a vegetative stage late into September (until daylength is less than about 12 hours and 20 minutes). This trait may negate or lessen the need for staggered plantings. Otherwise, these varieties are generally managed (planted, fertilized, etc.) in the same way as conventional cultivars. However, some research indicates that the quality of photoperiod-sensitive varieties is lower than the conventional cultivars. Reports from other states indicate that some companies are claiming their cultivars are photosensitive when they merely mature later.

Seeding Rate * lbs PLS/acre

Species

Planting Dates

Drilled

Broadcast

Pearl Millet

LV:

May 1 – July 1

P:

Apr. 15 – July 15

C:

Apr. 1 – Aug. 1

10-15

25-30

Sorghum x Sudan Hybrids

LV:

May 1 – July 15

P:

Apr. 15 – Aug. 1

C:

Apr. 1 – Aug. 15

15-20

20-25

Sudangrass

LV:

May 1 – July 1

P:

Apr. 15 – July 15

C:

Apr. 1 – Aug. 1

20-25

30-40

Forage Sorghum

LV:

Apr. 25 – May 15

P:

Apr. 15 – May 15

C:

Apr. 15 – June 1

15-20

20-25

* LV = Limestone Valley/Mountains Region; P = Piedmont Region; C = Coastal Plain Region of Georgia

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Project Achievement

Posted by romeethredge on March 22, 2013

Project Achievement is a good accomplishment for young 4-H’ers. They can do an illustrated talk on anything from Armadillos to Zinnias and can even show their singing , dancing or instrumental talents as well. We had a great group of 19 Seminole County 4-Hers this past Saturday that went to Moultrie with us to compete in a regional contest. They all did well and many came back with either a blue, red or white ribbon, but that isn’t as important as the experience they had getting up in front of others giving a speech.

 I remember well doing my DPA speech that my Daddy helped me complete concerning Soil Science even though it was forty years ago. It helps a young person realize that they can speak in front of a group of folks although it is a bit scary.

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