Seminole Crop E News

Agricultural News for Farmers and Agribusiness in SW Georgia

Peanuts Pegging

Posted by romeethredge on July 5, 2013

Peanuts are blooming and pegging well now and the root systems and nodulation look good.

photo (7)

 

 

_DSC8116

We need a break from the excess moisture though because the soils are saturated and in low areas of fields it really a problem. You can see below the yellowed plants, in low areas. When it stays this wet, the roots can’t get oxygen and we get some root death. Also on legumes like peanuts that fix their own nitrogen, we have problems in the Nitrogen fixation process when we are waterlogged.

UGA Extension Scientist, Dr. Scott Tubbs, gives the following explanation concerning this problem.

It is recommended to check fields that have received abundant  amounts of rain recently for nodule activity and active N-fixation.  To do so, select several plants from low  spots in the field that may have experienced prolonged saturated soil  conditions.  Slice several of the nodules  open on each plant.  If the nodules are  pink, red, or dark purple in color and appear moist on the interior, then those  nodules are healthy and there are no concerns of reduced N-fixation.  However, if the interior of the nodules are  gray, white, green, or brown in color and they appear dry on the interior, then  those nodules are most likely no longer active, so the chances of N deficiency  will be greater as we enter into pegging and pod-fill – a very N demanding  period of crop development.

When peanut roots and nodules are saturated and cannot  access oxygen, N-fixation can cease either temporarily or permanently.  Conditions can vary by soil type and  micro-climate, and we do not have data to determine exactly how long a peanut  plant can withstand adverse conditions, but we theorize that if a field was in  saturated soil conditions for 48 hours or less, then the crop may experience  brief yellowing from temporary shut-down of nodule activity, but the crop  likely will not experience any serious injury or yield loss.  Longer periods of water-logged conditions  start to carry concern of damage which may need to be addressed.

It’s possible that we may need to apply some nitrogen in some cases if the saturation continues.

_DSC8123

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: