Seminole Crop E News

Agricultural News for Farmers and Agribusiness in SW Georgia

Question of the Week – Male Cat Flea

Posted by romeethredge on April 23, 2015

Last week I had a photo of an insect brought in to me for identification. It had been found in the gentleman’s sock. It is a male cat flea, the most common flea pest on cats or dogs in North America. They are all too common and a pest that jumps on anything warm passing by, when its host isn’t around. A magnified photograph of the cat flea, the most common flea pest for dogs and cats in North America. Courtesy of Nancy Hinkle, UGA Department of Entomology

Here’s an excerpt and a link to a UGA article concerning flea control. “Before applying any flea insecticide, it is important to consider the total scope of the flea problem. The most important part of a complete flea control program — especially in a heavy infestation — is that a pet’s entire environment should be treated simultaneously. This means treating the pet, anywhere the pet spends time both indoors and outdoors and treating all the other furred animals in the household.

Cleaning up the outdoor environment involves keeping grass mowed short, trimming vegetation, raking the yard thoroughly, and removing organic debris from flowerbeds and under bushes to allow these areas to dry out. Following these steps also will increase the exposure of fleas to insecticides. Inside, pet owners should clean and vacuum any areas where their pet spends time such as the garage, basement, pet carrier or car. Owners should dispose of the vacuum bag immediately in an outdoor garbage can.

Seven to 10 days after the initial insecticide application, pet owners may have to apply a second treatment depending on weather conditions and how well the source points have been spot treated.”

This week’s question: What is this on Azalea leaves that was brought in to me this week?

_DSC1393

 

Advertisements

4 Responses to “Question of the Week – Male Cat Flea”

  1. ROY said

    LEAF GALL

  2. Scott said

    A fall created by a wasp in the family Comipidae.

  3. Scott said

    That is galls…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: