Seminole Crop E News

Agricultural News for Farmers and Agribusiness in SW Georgia

Archive for the ‘Soybeans’ Category

Soybean Expo – Feb 5 in Perry Ga

Posted by romeethredge on February 2, 2015

Soybean/Small Grain Expo is this Thursday in Perry, Ga, and it’s always a good meeting.There’s a $20 registration fee. Email Billy Skaggs for more information.  gacrop5@bellsouth.net

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Posted in Soybeans, Wheat | Tagged: , | Leave a Comment »

2015 Donalsonville Production Meetings

Posted by romeethredge on January 9, 2015

We have four agricultural production meetings planned here in Donalsonville. We will meet at the Lions Hall for these educational programs. Go ahead and put these on your calendar and we look forward to seeing you there. Pesticide applicator credit will be given.

Call or email our office if you plan to come so we can make plans. 229-524-2326 or uge4253@uga.edu

 

January 28 – Peanut Production Meeting

11:00a.m.  Donalsonville Lions Hall , Lunch Served

Speakers:Dr. Scott Montfort, UGA Extension Peanut Scientist

                  Dr. Nathan Smith, UGA Extension Ag Economist (by Video uplink)

 

January 29 – Cotton Production Meeting

12:00 noon Donalsonville Lions Hall , Lunch Served

Speakers:Dr. Jared Whittaker , UGA Extension Agronomist

                  Dr. Phillip Roberts, UGA Extension Entomologist

Soybean Production will be discussed after Cotton

 

February 16 – Corn Production Meeting

8:00a.m Seminole/Miller Counties in Donalsonville, Breakfast  Served

Speakers: Dr. Dewey Lee, UGA Extension Grains Scientist

                   Dr. Nathan Smith, UGA Extension Economist

                   Dr.  John Bernard, UGA (Silage)

 

February 26 – Weed Control Meeting

12:00  Noon Seminole/Miller Counties in Donalsonville, Lunch Served

Speakers: Dr. Eric Prostko, UGA Extension Weed Science

                   Dr. Stanley Culpepper, UGA Extension Weed Scientist

Posted in Corn, Cotton, Crops, Peanuts, Soybeans | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Ga Soybean Commodity Commission Newsletter

Posted by romeethredge on December 4, 2014

I was impressed with the first edition of the Ga Soybean Commodity Commission newsletter, that recently came out. It is very informative. If you would like to be added to their list to receive the newsletter then email Billy Skaggs and ask to get on the list.

Billy Skaggs,Executive Secretary,Georgia Soybean Commodity Commission

gasoybean@gmail.com

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Greg Mims, Seminole County Farmer, is the Chairman of the Georgia Commodity Commission for soybeans.

Georgia’s soybean farmers collectively invest a portion of their revenue to fund research and promotion efforts. This collective investment is called a check-off. The soybean check-off is a nationwide effort supported entirely by soybean farmers with individual contributions of 0.5 percent of the market price per bushel sold each season. If my figuring is correct that’s 5 cents per bushel if beans are $10.

 

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Soybean Harvest

Posted by romeethredge on November 14, 2014

Soybean harvest has been good on regular season beans and now the ultra late soybeans planted after corn harvest are being combined. They look good and I’m surprised that the moisture is as low as 10.5 % on them.  With the dry weather we have been able to get the crops out.

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Soybeans Maturing

Posted by romeethredge on October 30, 2014

Some of our soybeans that were planted at the regular time, our best planting dates are May 15th to June 15th, are getting mature and harvest has begun.

The Ultra Late soybeans planted after corn harvest are turning yellow and are getting very close to done for the year.  Here’s a photo of some and you can see that the pods are full so that is a good sign.

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Here’s some of the earlier planted soybeans that are ready for harvest as the seeds have dried down. To be considered dry for no deducts when you sell them, soybeans need to be at 13.5 % moisture.

 If you have drying capabilities you can harvest soybeans at 20% moisture and dry them down. If you plan to store soybeans in a bin they should be dried on down to 10% moisture.

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Here’s the comparison of the two ages in the field.

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Posted in Soybeans | Tagged: | 1 Comment »

Soybeans yellow and Dropping leaves

Posted by romeethredge on October 24, 2014

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Here’s a pivot that has full season soybeans on the left side. On the right a crop of field corn was grown and then these Ultra late soybeans were planted and they are still green and growing strong. The beans that were planted early are turning yellow and dropping leaves as they approach maturity.

I’ve had questions lately about irrigation termination on soybeans. You are generally safe to terminate irrigation if you have good soil moisture when the seeds fill the pods and the pods start to change to the yellow color in the top 4 nodes of the plant. Mississippi State has a good blog post concerning this subject.  Soybean Irrigation Termination

Some full season soybeans will be harvested soon. These warm days will help finish out the season for the Ultra late planted soybeans.

Posted in Agriculture, Soybeans | Tagged: | 1 Comment »

Downy in Soybean

Posted by romeethredge on August 27, 2014

Downy mildew of soybean is being found now in most all the fields I go into at low levels.  Downy mildew is easily identified as yellow spots on leaves with a characteristic tuft of fungal growth on the underside of each spot.  One may need to look carefully to see the fungal growth, which is typically a grey color.

 Dr. Bob Kemerait, UGA Extension Scientist says, “The University of Georgia typically does not recommend spraying fungicides for control of downy mildew because a) the disease is not believed to cause significant yield losses, and b) our fungicides for control of soybean diseases less effective against that type of fungus.”

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Soybeans – Ultra late are ultra buggy

Posted by romeethredge on August 18, 2014

Ultra late soybeans planted after corn harvest are having foliage feeder problems. This field I was in had many Beet Armyworm (BAW) hatchouts that were eating quite a bit. They looked good otherwise. Grower will soon go in with a herbicide for weeds and volunteer corn.  They are watering very often to the the beans growing well as we need good growth on this quick crop.

 

 

 

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Kudzu Bugs – Ready to Control

Posted by romeethredge on July 22, 2014

I looked at 2 blooming soybean fields today, and one had a good hatchout a few days old of juvenile kudzu bugs and the other had some just coming out of the eggs.

The grower chose to spray the one that has many juveniles hatched out. He also has a lot of various caterpillars and some foliage damage so he will piggyback a spray for caterpillars as well or use a combination product that will get both.

It was kind of surprizing that we’re seeing a few Velvet bean caterpillars (VBC), it’s a little early for them. We are seeing several types of caterpillars, mainly fall armyworms, beet armyworms  and soybean loopers.

The other grower will wait a few days to make sure most all of this second generation is hatched out so we can get a good kill. He doesn’t have many foliage feeders so he will just go with a pyrethroid for the bugs and some boron.

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In this photo below you can see the white egg cases.

 

 

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Posted in Agriculture, Entomology, Soybeans | Tagged: , | Leave a Comment »

Soybeans – Kudzu bugs

Posted by romeethredge on July 18, 2014

We are seeing good numbers of kudzu bugs in soybeans now. Folks are asking what to do.

We don’t need to treat until the second generation in soybeans. In other words we need to wait until we see the young fuzzy nymphs before we treat them. This is usually when we have young pods on the plants.

 If you go by a patch of Kudzu, you can see all phases of bugs now, nymphs, eggs and adults. The second generation on Kudzu has moved to soybeans in many fields.

Here’s a link back to a comprehensive Kudzu bug post I made a while back. https://seminolecropnews.wordpress.com/2013/05/30/seeing-more-and-more-kudzu-bugs/

UGA Photo by Russ Ottens

Kudzu bug

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Here’s Jim Dozier in some of his soybeans we recently looked at. They had a few foliage feeders but nothing bad enough to treat.

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Posted in Entomology, Soybeans | Tagged: , | Leave a Comment »

 
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